Spring 2015 History Courses

Registration has arrived! The department has some great courses for the Spring – check them out below:

HIST 298       War & Peace in Middle Ages (4 credits)
TR 1:30-3:10, Ann Brodeur

Much of our modern expectations of the conduct of warfare are rooted in the Middle Ages: what is a just war? what are the rules of war and of peace? This course will examine the ethos and ethics of war and peace in the Middle Ages, from the late Roman world to 1453. Students will examine the interplay between war, politics and society, as well as the relationships between the peace movements, emergent just war theory, and chivalry in the context of major conflicts such as the Crusades and the Hundred Years’ War.
History Majors: This course fulfills you “Ancient and Medieval World” requirement, and for those following the old program, your thematic period course requirement.

 

HIST 333       East-Central Europe: Monarch to EU (4 credits)
TR 9:55-11:35, Zsolt Nagy

“This course investigates the history of East and East-Central Europe from the late eighteenth century to the present, with special emphasis given to Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary. Tomáš Masaryk, the first President of Czechoslovakia, once described Europe as a “laboratory atop a vast graveyard.” Albeit Masaryk described the entire continent after the First World War, his depiction—dark as it is—certainly summarizes the collective historical experience of Eastern Europe. In this laboratory the people of the region experimented with liberalism, nationalism, fascism, communism, and democracy. The following questions will guide our survey of this fascinating region: What/where is Eastern Europe? Is there something peculiar about its political, economic and cultural development? What forces shaped the region? To what degree did the Eastern Europeans have control over their own history?                                                                 History Majors: This course fulfills your “Europe Since 1450” requirement and, for those following the old program, your limited period course requirement.

HIST 348       Japan Through Literature (4 credits)

MWF 1:35-2:40, Patti Kameya
This course examines modern Japanese history through novels and short stories written between the turn of the century to the present. We will consider how and why fiction can be used as historical texts even while it has not “facts.” As we read and analyze works of literature as historical texts we will address the question, “How do various people negotiate change at different points in time?” Throughout the course we will discuss themes such as modernization, empire, postwar society, and consumer culture. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course.
History Majors: This course fulfills your “The Non-Western World” requirement and, for those following the old program, your thematic period course requirement.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­HIST 353       History of the American Revolution (4 credits)
MWF 9:35-10:40, Anne Osler

Why did thirteen marginally unified colonies go to war against Great Britain? Was it just a tax revolt? Was it really a revolution? What changed? Who won? Who lost? Does the Constitution represent a fulfillment of the revolutionary generation’s dreams? Or, does the Constitution represent a betrayal of the revolutionary generation’s dreams? History of the American Revolution explores these fascinating questions spanning the years 1763 to 1787. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course.                                                                History Majors: This course fulfills your “The Americas and Their Colonial Antecedents” requirement and, for those following the old program, your limited period course requirement.

HIST 355       Civil War Era (4 credits)

MWF 10:55-12:00, David Williard
The American Civil War was a pivotal event, followed by incomplete efforts at changing the shape of the nation through Reconstruction. The causes of the war, its conduct on both sides, and the consequences of this “War of Rebellion,” including Reconstruction, form the three parts of this course. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course
History Majors: This course fulfills your “The Americas and Their Colonial Antecedents” requirement and, for those following the old program, your limited period course requirement.


HIST 366       History of the American Catholic Church (4 credits)

TR 8:00-9:40, Anne Klejment

Analysis of the American Catholic church from the mission era through the post Vatican II period, with emphasis on the diverse populations who have comprised the American Catholic church throughout its history. The focus of the course examines the changing relationship between Catholics, their church, and American society. Topics analyzed include anti-Catholicism and nativism; slavery and other forms of racial and ethnic injustice; economic justice and peace; ethnic and gendered spiritualities; the nature of the pre-Vatican II and post-Vatican II Catholic church. Extensive use of sources generated by minority American Catholics emphasize the rich thought and religious experiences of Catholics from diverse backgrounds. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course.
History Majors: This course fulfills your “The Americas and Their Colonial Antecedents” requirement and, for those following the old program, your thematic course requirement.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­HIST 386       Historical Archaeology (4 credits)
MWF 12:15-1:20, Ivancica SchrunkThe course offers an understanding of archaeological theories, methods, and interpretations in discovering, reconstructing, and understanding past societies in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Australia, and Europe. Archaeology primarily deals with material remains of societies and time periods that lack written documents. Historical archaeology combines the methods of archaeology with analysis of written and oral sources. Together, archaeology and history provide a critical reappraisal of historical events and cultural change around the world. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course.
History Majors: This course fulfills you “Ancient and Medieval World” requirement.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­HIST 464       Capstone Seminar in Non-Western History: Labor in the Atlantic World (4 credits)
TR, 3:25-5:00, Kari Zimmerman

This seminar examines the major historical interpretations of labor in the Atlantic World from the 18th to the mid-20th centuries. The Atlantic Ocean served as a crossroads for new forms and concepts of economic activity between Europe, Africa, North and South America. Situating our interpretation within this Atlantic World, the course reconsiders how we define labor history and its influences. Students will critically analyze how key issues in labor can transcend geographical boundaries as well as conceptual frameworks such as race, ethnicity, gender and class. After discussing the historiography and methodology of investigations on both labor and the Atlantic World, students will conduct their own research on work within a global context. Prerequisites: at least three History courses numbered 200 or above, including at least one of the following: HIST 240, 241, 244, 253, 348, 349.

HIST 298       Church in Latin America (4 credits)
TR 9:55-11:35, TR 1:30-3:10, Kari Zimmerman

In this course we will study Christian theology and practice in a context of great suffering and struggle. We analyze the various forms that Christianity has taken in Latin America from the period of the Spanish Conquest to the present. We will study the history of the Church in Latin America, but more importantly we will examine the theological issues raised in each era to see how Christians have lived their faith under different circumstances. As we examine the complex interplay of Church, poverty, and power in Latin American history, we will examine theologies and spiritualities of evangelization, liberation, martyrdom, poverty, and the Church. We will also study and critique specifically Latin American methods and approaches to the theological task itself. Finally, we will examine the coming of the Latin American Church to the United States through immigration. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115
History Majors: This course fulfills your “The Americas and Their Colonial Antecedents” requirement and, for those following the old program, your thematic course requirement.

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