Historical Voices – Weekly Round-Up for April 24, 2015

Another multi-media weekly round-up as we consider this week how we construct history. In other words, which sources do we use to create a narrative of the past?

This stories we’re reading in the news touch on the role of individual testimonies through letters, oral histories, and artwork. What are you reading lately?

Armenian genocide1. The Legacy of the Armenian Genocide: How the events of one hundred years ago directly affect the every day lives of Armenians around the globe. How do we understand these testimonies in light of competing interpretations of this historical event?

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/apr/24/armenian-genocide-survivors-stories-my-dreams-cannot-mourn?CMP=fb_gu

SCU Homeless Program

2. The Voices of Homelessness in the Twin Cities: Our local colleague Dr. Louise Edwards-Simpson at St. Kate’s recently launched the “Voices of Homelessness Oral History Project” – a digital archive of oral histories of students that have experienced homelessness. Listen to the MPR interview to understand how Dr. Edwards-Simpson and collaborator Luci Russell created an online testimony to the many students that experience insecure housing during the college career.

http://www.mprnews.org/story/2015/04/14/bcst-st-catherine-university-student-homelessness

The online archive is available here: http://sophia.stkate.edu/scuvoh_audio/

Internment Camp Art3. Japanese Internment Camp Art Sale Canceled: Who “owns” the rights to tell your history? After Japanese-Americans launched a national protest – in part through social media – an art collector canceled the scheduled auction of artwork and artifacts from several Japanese Internment Camps during WWII. Where does this work belong and who should determine the way our nation recognizes this part of our history?

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/18/arts/design/seller-in-canceled-internment-camp-auction-comes-forward.html

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